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A Note on the 2017 Chilean Primary Elections

Chile does not usually hold presidential primary elections. For that reason, we typically arrive at election day in November with five or six (or more) candidates on the ballot and thus no one ends up getting at least 50.1% of the vote. Therefore, the top two vote-getters do a run-off election in December, called la segunda vuelta.

However, this year (2017) the “Right” is having a primary election for its three top contenders on Sunday, July 2nd. Besides former president Sebastián Piñera (independent, populist, center-right), the other two candidates from the Right are Senator Miguel José Ossandón (an independent, ignorant-but-popular, centrist, pragmatic populist) and Representative (diputado) pro-life, libertarian-leaning Felipe Kaast (political evolution party).

The hard Left is having a primary, too, with key contenders being radio reporter Beatriz Sánchez (supported by the Humanist Party and also many left-leaning libertarians, including the Liberal Party) and sociologist Alberto Mayol (from the “wide front” coalition). The Right and hard-left primaries will narrow the candidate field a bit in November.

Since the “moderate” Left could not come to any agreement within their coalition to have a primary, their two prominent candidates: senators Carolina Goic (Christian Democrat) and Alejandro Guillier (Radical Party, also backed by the Socialist party) will both run in November. The centrist Christian Democrats are even talking about supporting the Right instead this year in the second round (if Goic does not make the cut) should favored centrist Sebastián Piñera win the Right’s primary. Morevoer, if things look bad for Goic in November, these voters might turn to Piñera in the first round instead, which might push him over the top and preclude the necessity of having a December run-off.

If you can read Spanish, see the write-up at this link where you can learn more about each of the candidates. Remember that both citizens and permanent residents (of at least five years) can vote in Chile. Permanent residents and citizens living abroad can also vote; they should contact their local Chilean consulates to find out how to do so.

At first glance, libertarians that vote should do so for Kaast. Like Ron Paul, he will likely not win. In the end, we will probably be stuck with Piñera again and he will face Guillier, Goic and the green-leaning or communist candidate. In that case, Piñera would clearly be better, in spite of his populist support for the “morning after pill” and silly labor laws used to “buy” votes.

Since the primary ballots allow voters to select either leftist or rightist candidates, some have suggested that the hard left will go to the polls in July to vote for Kaast or Ossandón in order to derail Piñera and keep the Christian Democrats in the leftist fold. The center-left candidates would have a shot at beating Kaast or Ossandón but would be unlikely to beat Piñera. So, the strategy makes sense.

At the moment, the Right is far ahead. Chile has endured four long years of detrimental leftist-rule and the populace is tired of it. Whichever rightist candidate wins will undoubtedly receive the support of the backers of the other rightist pretenders–just as with the Republican Party in the USA. Once again, if Goic supporters fall in with Piñera over Guillier, then it is even possible that the Right could win in the first round (la primera vuelta) of elections in November.

Achieving that would mark an historic victory for the Right and put it firmly in the political driver’s seat. For that reason, some libertarians I know will be voting for Piñera instead of Kaast in July. They like Kaast better, of course, but are being pragmatic. They also see Kaast as just warming up now so that he can take the bid in 2021. Could be the case. I am no fan of Piñera. I am a libertarian. But I am a fan of Chile and I must confess that Chile will probably fare far better under Piñera than Guillier or Goic.

The bigger races to watch are, perhaps, the congressional seats in hotly contested parts of Chile, especially Viña del Mar, Concepción, Punta Arenas and some areas of south central Chile (Temuco to Puerto Montt). Iquique and Arica might also turn right if the politics are well-played and the rightest candidate is only opposed by a hard-left one.

As always, the northeastern part of Santiago will go to the Right. However, adjacent parts like La Reina, Santiago, Puente Also, Ñuñoa and Huecheraba will be, as always, in a tug-of-war between Left and Right. The same is true for Estación Central, Maipú and La Florida. The Right needs to do well in these districts if it wants to be able to shift Chile back on the right track. The Right typically forms a tight coalition in the houses of Congress, meaning that individual ideas are less important. The balance of power needs to be shifted back and recover the ground lost in 2013.

If the Right wins big like it did in last year’s mayoral races, Chile could become even more solidly libertarian and an even better place to do business. Keep a close eye on things. 2018 could be a very good year!

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s updated and enlarged 2017 book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $129.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights (somewat outdated) found in the larger book. Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)

Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)

A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)

A Second Citizenship Beyond Chilean

There are certain motifs that fascinate expatriates in general. The most common ones I hear are gold and its storage, tax reduction, escaping warfarism or welfarism, relationships with non-American women, offshore banking, lower-cost living (lifestyle upgrade) and second passports. For many of them, this last motif requires a great, if not the greatest, amount of time and capital to acquire.

American expatriates are the most beleaguered. All U.S. passport holders are subject to double taxation if they live and earn money outside of the land of the free. The is a real bummer. They are often shunned by overseas banks that do not want to hassle with FATCA rules. They are potential targets of “terrorism” and kidnapping more frequently than nearly all, if not all, other countries. They are subject to many arcane and Draconian rules and legislation that make their lives more onerous.

Nevertheless, they cannot simply get rid of their American citizenship. First, they must pay a few thousand dollars to get the U.S. government’s permission to let them go. Then, if they have over two million dollars in assets worldwide, they must pay an exit tax of thirty percent of all that they own. Finally, lest they become a “stateless person,” they have to have already acquired another citizenship.

European and other expatriates do not have the same trouble. They simply need to leave their home country and live elsewhere to avoid the taxation issues. No need to renounce their native nationality, unless it happens to be North Korea, Cuba or an unsavory Muslim, African or Southeast Asian country. (In those cases, the course of action will be similar to that undertaken by Americans.) Bank accounts are not a problem to open and most other countries are not big targets of “terrorism” like the U.S.A. is. They just need to get a second nationality if there are other hindrances at home that bother them or to give them some flexibility for work and travel.

In any case, it always pays to have a second passport in case the country underlying the first one runs into trouble. Economic theory suggests that more opportunities make one wealthier. All the more so when a second passport comes at little additional cost. A second nationality can also provide local benefits such as membership to exclusive, ethnic country clubs (as in Santiago and Viña del Mar), private schools for one’s children that feature the language of the home country, business connections and jobs for those that want to work in a multinational firm (e.g., a European company with an office in Santiago), which likes or requires you to have the legal right to work in the home country. Thus, if one could cheaply acquire four or five nationalities it might make sense to do so, although nationalities are subject to diminishing returns at some point.

Chile has a straightforward, five-year path to citizenship that carries little financial cost. It is a well-respected passport and offers visa-free travel to most destinations of the world (even Russia!). Chilean citizens living abroad do not pay taxes at home (in Chile). Chileans bother no one and thus they are not targets. They can open bank accounts without difficulties anywhere in the world where expats tend to go. The biggest hitch for those that seek Chilean citizenship is the requirement to live in Chile for 185 days during their first year of residency.

For most Europeans, and perhaps Canadians, Australians and Kiwis, Chile will be the second passport. For Americans, and perhaps South Africans, Israelis and Canadians (due to Canada’s strong ties to the U.S.A.), Chilean citizenship will replace their original nationality. In that latter case, a second passport is often sought.

The best and easiest means of getting a second passport is through ancestral citizenship requests in Italy, Poland, Ireland, Hungary, Latvia or Lithuania. Those countries, especially the first three (from which so many millions emigrated in the 19th and 20th centuries), make it relatively easy and cheap to regain citizenship by bloodline. One’s offspring and spouse will usually obtain the nationality along with him, or at least have the option to do so. Accordingly, those that can, will—and should—go this route. (Note that the idea is to get a backup country, not live in that country necessarily.)

Other folks will have to look on the world market and see how much they must pay to acquire a second passport. I have heard Bulgaria could cost as much as US$625,000, while Malta is much less, as are Dominica and other Caribbean islands and Costa Rica. Residency requirements vary widely with these choices. A final method entails running a second citizenship course that parallels the quest for the Chilean one. After the first year or so (more like 18 months). one only need be in Chile for one day per year to maintain his permanent residency, leaving a person free to spend more time in Paraguay, Ecuador, Brazil, Thailand, New Zealand, Switzerland, Australia, Estonia, Georgia or any number of island nations (Bahamas, Cook Islands, Mauritius, etc.), European enclaves, Singapore or other target country.

In my mind, the ideal situation is to attain Chilean citizenship and, if you happen to have it, ditch American citizenship at the lowest cost possible. If one does not have another citizenship from his home country, he should then try to get at least one more, perhaps from an E.U. country that is well-received and admired. I like country lists and rankings very much, even though I often disagree with the criteria or results in certain cases. Accordingly, Nomad Capitalist puts out a nifty passport ranking, Nomad Passport Index, that provides a starting point for choosing a second passport. Note that the top ten are all European passports, including Italy and Ireland, and the top thirty are dominated by European nations. I suggest you have a look there to see what countries’ passports might be of greatest interest to you. One reason that an E.U. country makes sense is because with any E.U. passport you have the right to live in and work or study in any E.U. country. So it is almost like getting twenty-eight countries for the price of one! Even if the country issuing the passport is in worse shape than Chile, there is a chance that one of the others will not be.

You might pick one where learning the third language (after English and Spanish) might provide an interesting hobby. Americans might also choose to avoid countries with strong taxation and regulatory ties to the United States, like Canada, the U.K. and Australia and, in some cases, avoid countries with alliances to promote family court and child services division rulings and punish violators that have “fled” (e.g., Portugal, Norway, Finland, the U.K., Australia, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Ireland, Poland, Holland, Switzerland and, to a lesser extent, France and Spain). As with most things, the optimal choice for any one person depends on tastes and personal circumstances.

The bottom line is that it makes sense to be prepared. We have no idea what will happen in Chile in five, ten or twenty years. It is best to take steps now to have options in the future that are better than what refugees or asylum-seekers carry with them.

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s updated and enlarged 2017 book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, Fourth Edition, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $129.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights (somewat outdated) found in the larger book. Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)

Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)

A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)

Trump Administration May Pave the Way to Relinquish US Citizenship for as Low as $15.55

As many current and aspiring expatriates of the United States are aware, the number of Americans renouncing citizenship has been on the rise over the past decade or so.

Once the blue passport was sought by people worldwide, and flashed with pride by its bearers. The nations of the world recognized its holders as those who perhaps enjoyed more freedom and prosperity. Many nations opened their arms, banks readied their vaults and various business opportunities unfolded before them.

However, as the citizenry began to wake up to the fact that the state perceives them as property, the brilliant blue cover of a US passport lost much of its luster. The ominous taxes that continued to be imposed along with reams of draconian regulations took their tolls. Being only one of two countries in the world (Eritrea is the other) that requires its subjects to report and potentially pay taxes on all international income has certainly helped to build the resentment from both citizens and the international community alike.

FATCA implementation agreements

Internationally, warmongering and imperialistic pursuits didn’t help. This, along with the narcissistic attitudes of many Americans and the eventual impositions of the IRS and other alphabet soup agencies that form the long arm of US injustice and arrogation wore down once strong, vibrant and mutually beneficial relationships.

Blessing or Curse

Today, many banks shun the little blue book. If you are from just about any other country, they open their arms to new business. But the penalty exacted by the strength of US banks, the IRS, the caving of various governments to the political pressure of the US and the asinine FATCA invasion have resulted in banks closing their doors to US citizens.

As a result, more of them are leaving the US each year. Some just leave and work elsewhere for vocational reasons. Others want to live somewhere specifically, so go for it. But an ever growing number find ways to leave the confines of the US Inc in order to escape the insanity of the state imposing on their every move. They’re tired of the over-regulation and seemingly endless taxes on every move they make, unless it’s illegal, of course. A growing number of these are renouncing their citizenship.

As recently as seven years ago (2008), there were only 235 who renounced. That more than tripled the following year, then doubled again in 2010 to 1485, the year FATCA was implemented. Interestingly, it was that year that the US decided it should be charging to permit people to escape its clutches. The fee that year was $450. This resulted in an increase of only about 300, to 1,781 in 2011.

Something odd happened in 2012. Numbers are supposed to be reported quarterly, but two quarters were missed, so the total came out to 932. However, those lost numbers were apparently reported the following year, resulting in 2,999 reunciations. That year also saw the fee increase to $990.

So, how did a 220% increase in the price for freedom from the US affect renunciations? The following year, 2014, saw an increase to 3.415 citizens willing to pay for the keys to their US tax shackles. Incidentally, when getting grilled by the consulate over why you’re renouncing, stating that it’s for tax purposes is inadvisable. They may deny you. Of course, they may deny you because they have indigestion too, but most who’ve I’ve read about found the process fairly straightforward, other than the onerous fees. But it gets better.

Last year the fees were raised to an astounding $2,350, ostensibly because that’s what it costs to do the paperwork. Yet that year saw the most dramatic increase in renunciations so far, at around 6,000.

When is Being Owned NOT Slavery?

Make no mistake – this is the blatant pricing of freedom. When a person who is forced to be a tax slave, regardless of where they live and the source of their income, then it is clear that the extorting agent is claiming ownership. Just how much is your freedom worth? According to US Inc, $2,350 will remove your shackles. Of course, if you’re worth more than about $2,000,000 or have had a decent income over the past few years, you will be rewarded with paying an expatriation tax on top of any taxes you have already paid. If you haven’t kept current with your filing, it could get much worse.

If you expatriated on or after June 17, 2008, the new IRC 877A expatriation rules apply to you if any of the following statements apply.

  • Your average annual net income tax for the 5 years ending before the date of expatriation or termination of residency is more than a specified amount that is adjusted for inflation ($151,000 for 2012, $155,000 for 2013, $157,000 for 2014, and $160,000 for 2015).
  • Your net worth is $2 million or more on the date of your expatriation or termination of residency.
  • You fail to certify on Form 8854 that you have complied with all U.S. federal tax obligations for the 5 years preceding the date of your expatriation or termination of residency.
    Source: IRS

A Threat to Freedom of Speech = A Veiled Offer of Freedom?

There was recently a string of tweets and articles from the PEOTUS regarding the burning of flags. Such a right is guaranteed by the Constitution, but we all are well aware that regulations haven’t bowed before constitutional law for decades. Even though the Supreme Court has ruled that it is someone’s protected First Amendment right, many continue to strive to meet out punishment for any who would be so traitorous as to burn the emblem of those who would claim to own them. One of these would-be oppressors is Hillary, who introduced legislation in 2005 that would require a $100,000 fine and one year in prison for anyone burning an American flag.

Apparently the president elect has similar ideas, but with a very interesting twist. He was quoted as stating:

Nobody should be allowed to burn the American flag – if they do, there must be consequences – perhaps loss of citizenship or year in jail!

You mean, that’s all it will take? Then you get a choice?

This, of course, prompted an interesting string of comments around the interwebs. Peter Schiff was all over it.

 

If all that is required to lose U.S. citizenship is burning a flag, there are Americans all over the world who would gladly burn one if it gets them out of paying the $2,350 filing fee, or for wealthier Americans paying the far more onerous exit tax!

Posted by Peter Schiff on Tuesday, November 29, 2016

 


So, I did some looking around. You can buy a 3’x5′ American flag for just $15.55 on Amazon.

Of course, you can buy one for about any price you want to pay. But this seemed like a pretty reasonable price and substantial enough to actually catch flame visibly enough to make sure the evidence is irrefutable.

But Seriously?

#Satire aside (kinda), I really have no desire to burn the flag. To me, it’s just senseless noise. But neither do I desire to continue to be considered a tool of the state. Renunciation is a distinct possibility for my future.

Depending on your goals, you may require another passport before renouncing. In most cases, that means at least five years as a half-time resident in the country you choose. In other words, you’d need to spend at least 185 days of each year there in order to satisfy the local requirements. This varies from country to country, but it seems somewhat standard with many South American countries.

There are services that will sell you instructions and respond to email questions regarding permanent residency (not including a passport) in their country for about $500-$1,000. If you know the language, or have someone that can help, and are pretty confident in your ability to navigate, this might be a great option. This is particularly true if you don’t have much in the way of expendable cash.

For those who would rather have someone either walk them through it or take care of most of the legwork for them, the sky is really the limit. However, if you’re paying more than about $5,000 for really good service, depending on additional options, then you’re probably paying too much. Perhaps there are countries where higher fees are merited, but in most countries the work required isn’t really worth more than a few thousand bucks. The process usually takes a little over two years, depending upon bureaucratic hurdles.

Once you have permanent residency, you’re on the road to getting your passport, if you care to. Again, this will take about five years.

You don’t have to get a new residency or citizenship though. There is provision for renunciation as a stateless person as well. Of course, you are warned by the US government that doing so is inadvisable because you would no longer enjoy the protection of any government.

A final note on this: I’m no law expert, but it appears that the charging for renunciation may in fact be illegal. For those who want to dig further, you might start at the U.S. Department of State – Bureau of Consular Affairs and with Cornell’s Legal Information Institute.

Remember, it’s on you to do your own research. Due your own due diligence and caveat emptor apply, especially when dealing with international laws. These are the apparent options before you, but often we find hidden gems to help us along our way. And, whether you seek to renounce or pursue another path, may you enjoy freedom of both mind and body.

Looking to Leave America? You Should Be More Scared than You Are!

I was reflecting recently on some differences between Chile and the United States. This is an election year in the Land of the Free, and the candidates are so unpopular that the Libertarian Party is even getting considerable support. I should be overjoyed but, alas, even as a libertarian, I cannot get behind the libertarian ticket since Gary Johnson is in favor of abortion–a common American malady. There is no more egregious tyranny than killing innocent human beings on account of their underdevelopment, their inconvenience or because human reproduction requires the use of a womb. Yet, this sort of hypocrisy among American libertarians is widespread. At least one-half of American libertarians are willing to kill an unborn human being if the womb-provider objects to his existence.

This sort of irony traces back to great American libertarians like Thomas Jefferson, who enslaved people and even engendered children by some of his slaves. Then there were even greater American tyrants, albeit non-libertarians of course, like Abraham Lincoln, who feigned an anti-slavery posture to promote his own power at the expense of over 660,000 lives.

Chile’s libertarian element is not so calloused or brutal. Indeed, I find most of them to be far more consistent libertarians than their American counterparts.

Nevertheless, Chileans are also great hypocrites. Abortion is illegal in nearly all cases here and yet abortion still occurs. They say one thing and do another in this respect, so long as their unblemished image can be upheld. Chileans are so preoccupied about their public image that they go to great lengths to dress up in public, so as not to appear, for instance, as a day-laborer or maid en route. Plus, they try to get a home (even if poorly-built) in one of the best sections of town. Then they can boast of living among the upper classes. They buy image and status through acquiring a respectable address.

If you examine the construction quality of upper class apartments, you will usually find that the front door and foyer are lavish, well-built items; the landscaping and manicured lawn outside are often subpurb, too. However, true to Chilean hypocritical imagery, the quality of windows, doors, flooring, kitchen and bathrooms (among other things) inside each apartment is mediocre.

Socially speaking, most Chileans are not virtuous. The great majority secretly applaud lying, cheating and even stealing at times, often making jokes about how artful and adroit Chilean thieves are. Everyone laughs at those jokes since they know the substance to be true. Surely, the upper classes do not like being robbed, but loss by theft is sort of taken for granted in Chilean society.

Chilean “justice” is a joke for the most part, as I have commented on previously. People have to fend for themselves if they want justice and protection. Maybe laughing at the degraded level of their fellow Chileans is a way of coping with the reality of living in a dishonest society. It is a sad state of affairs.

Yet, people here get offended when I or others point out the foibles of Chilean culture. They do not want to hang out their dirty laundry for the world to see, and especially immigrants like me should never violate this sanctum of Chilean culture. They want the world to see Chile at its best as the most prosperous nation in Latin America and sophisticated enough to rescue its 33 trapped miners in 2010. For this reason, they all come together to support their soccer team when it wins international championships. They love to bask in favorable international limelight. Hence, there is an odd unity and solidarity here in terms of sports even if people do not trust each other.

The difference, then, between cultures up yonder and Chilean culture is that Chileans are desconfiados. While most Americans truly believe what others say or that the “system” works, Chileans do not. Ironically, one reason that Chile does not have an institutionalized welfare state like the United States, Canada, Australia or Europe is precisely because Chileans do not trust others; they know that their fellow countrymen will game the system. Thus, Chilean welfare benefits are not as widespread or lavish.

In Chile, no one is surprised when a politician gets his hand stuck in the cookie jar or is found to be corrupt. Such behavior is expected. On the one hand, in the “Land of the Free,” people still tend to be shocked or at least believe that such problems are confined to an elite political class of Clintons or Bushes. Some believe that a man like Trump will really be different since he is an “outsider.” When he turns out to be just as bad or worse, then these true believers will be temporarily disheartened. However, memories are short and in just four more years they will be ripe pickings for the next demagogue that comes along.

On the other hand, Chileans do not see things the way Americans do. They know that most candidates are running more for their personal gain than to serve the public interest or principles. They are used to people trying to beguile them and thus are not as easily beguiled.

Nevertheless, when it comes to successful policies of the Right, Chileans tend to be frequently tricked. In a recent interview on public television with José Piñera, the founder of the private Chilean pension system (AFP), that is now used in thirty countries, the leftist commentator and interviewer tried to paint the AFP system as a bad thing. He showed anecdotal evidence where a few pensioners interviewed claimed that they were only earning pensions of 200,000 pesos (US$300) per month. No one inquired if they had paid in to their plan for all years or if there were large gaps in payments (lagunas). Private social security only works if one saves. Like José Piñera said, the system may be a fabulous Mercedes Benz but if you do not put fuel into the tank then it will not serve you well. Moreover, one pension provider released data showing that the average pension for many thousands of men that had contributed for over 30 years is 650,000 pesos (US$1,000) per month, which is 6% more than the targeted 70% of replacement income sought by the system. Thus, the system is working, even with imperfections, but the Left will simply lie and discount this fact, which can be very frustrating for rightists and libertarians once the crafty leftists convince disgruntled voters. The Left is a constant problem. Even the best parts of Chilean economic life are being rattled, just like the Left continues to rattle countries in the Northern Hemisphere.

But let us be candid: while Chile has its problems, America has much greater problems (and so does Europe). Moreover, America does not have benefits like AFP that Chile established. It still is beleaguered by socialism. Whether Trump or Hillary wins, Americans will still pay far more taxes than Chileans do (perhaps four times more); their government will still kill innocent people at home or abroad (directly or indirectly); they will still have a raging, violent society, with brutal cops; they will still be affected by an ignorant populace, dumbed-down by the public school and media addictions; they will still face the hardships of political correctness and the undue burdens of over-regulation or property confiscations (either Kelo-style or by customs agents); they will face horrific danger from family court scoundrels and child services division thugs; they will still face a declining standard of living and egregious manipulations of the currency by the central bank; they will suffer from the fallout of pressure groups seeking privileges: homosexual activists, radical feminists, anti-religious people, radical ecologists and welfare cadets; they will have to face increasing socialism, Obamacare and welfare Ponzi schemes like Social Security.

Therefore, for all the negative things that one can says about Chile, America is far worse. All of the bad things just listed are prevalent and growing in America but have yet to take a foothold in Chile. I am not saying that Chile will never have such maladies, but for now we have mercifully fewer of them. Indeed, if you are living in America, you should be more scared than ever before! Chileans have little to fear from the civil authority, as bad as things might be here. But in America (and Europe) one faces a real and growing threat. Denying this fact will not make it go away.

Lesser Evil

Are you sick and tired of putting up with it in America or Europe? Why not consider Chile as a freer, saner alternative? It is not a perfect place, but you can more easily cope with social evils here than those common throughout most of the Northern Hemisphere. You can live in relative peace, and have a beautiful ocean view in Viña del Mar like I do, at a reasonable price.

The first step you should take is to buy the book Life in Chile (ordering instructions below) and read it in its entirety. Next step is to become a member of EscapeAmericaNow.info and participate in the monthly webinar. These two things will get you well-informed. Decide if you simply want to “get out of Dodge” or just establish a Plan B residence in Chile, “just in case.” Then make your reservations to come down and acquire the original, certified documents you will need to obtain a visa.

Do not neglect to move a substantial portion of your assets offshore. Without money, you will not be able to do anything. By delaying, you only hurt yourself and damage your own chances of survival.

Do not procrastinate. The world situation is not a board game. It is real and is coming your way quickly. If there were ever a time to be afraid or a little worried, it is now.

Also posted here on Steemit.

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s updated and enlarged 2016 book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $149.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books. Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)

Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)

A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)

Those Who Can, Cannot and Will Not Come to Chile

I have been a Chile consultant for many years. One thing that has always puzzled me are the ironies seen in the kinds and classes of people that want to migrate to Chile, as well as the turmoil or frustration that so many of them face.

Can and Do

First off, there are those that can and do come to Chile, at least to get a Plan B residence established. They are wealthier people, normally with assets over US$2 million, with some exceptions of single men that can get by on less, or they have pensions between US$5,000 and US$10,000 per month (which is more than enough to live in Chile). They are usually libertarians or constitutional conservatives. They want a freer, saner life than their increasingly beleaguered existence in the “Land of the Free” or some other Northern Hemisphere welfare state. They are not “turned on” by the likes of Obama, Bush, Hillary or Trump. They often have substantial assets out of their home country and thus already have a foot out the door. They are well-studied on the issues and make educated choices about where to immigrate and how to handle life. I will call this fortunate, “will do” group the top 20%. They are wise, as Proverbs 27:12 says: “A prudent man foresees evil and hides himself; the simple pass on and are punished.”

Can but Won’t

Next, there is the group of well-to-dos or upper-middle class folks that toy with Chile or emigrating, but never seem to get around to doing anything about it. They are masterful at making up excuses why they have not and will not act in their best interests to minimize political, economic and violence risk by setting up residence elsewhere in the world. “If the USA goes down, so will every other country in the world” or “I do not want to learn another language at my age” are favorite “reasons” why they would rather stay and perish or fall into an even more crass slavery than they presently find themselves. They dabble in expatriate literature and are genuinely concerned what the world will be like under the regimes to come. But they are not scared enough to actually act; unrealistic optimism always seems to win the day. They are more worried about being near family. Or they just think that maybe things will not be so bad. They are, in a word, “boxcar bait.” Those that can get out at the last minute will end up being “raft people” because there will not be enough seats on airline or boats to get them out when they want to leave. Full of endless excuses and procrastination, I hold out little hope for these people. I will call this mildly-arrogant, procrastinating, “will not” group the middle 50%. Their epitaph will read: “Could have escaped, but failed to do so.”

Would but Can’t

Finally, there is the most tragic case of those that really, truly want to leave but cannot do so. They simply lack the basic resources required for their family size to leave and/or resettle, and have little hope of working in Chile to earn enough to do so. They see the danger and want to flee but are trapped. Their situation is sad. They have often done their homework and want to come to Chile. They call me but, alas, there is little that I can do for them. Why is this (relatively large) group so much more insightful than the aforementioned reluctant group with resources? Who knows?

People from each of the three groups tend to be well-educated. The difference seems to be in courage, logic, sensibility and insight, as well and financial feasibility. People in this last group are willing to do whatever it takes to get to Chile but it is simply not enough: they do not have the Spanish or cultural skill sets to prosper in Chile, nor do they have the capital needed to start a business here. They are stuck on the sinking ship and, worse yet, they know it. The best they can do is keep researching and looking for that windfall that will send them where they want to go or at least open the door to get there. Otherwise, they uncomfortably await judgment day. A lot of grief and hardship are ahead of them. I will call this hapless, doleful, “cannot” group the bottom 30%. As Job said (14:1), “Man who is born of woman is of few days and full of trouble.”

Where do You Fall?

Where do you fit in? Are you satisfied to be in that group? If you want to change, what can you do about it?

The first thing that any of the aforementioned folks should do is get my newly revised book and read it cover-to-cover. Anyone considering coming to Chile for real should devour the 1,665 pages it contains. As a newcomer you simply cannot get enough information about your new country. The new edition is like having six different books on relevant Chile topics in one volume. Sections can be read and re-read as needed. The US$149 will be paid for many times over in efficiency gains alone, not to mention orienting you in the direction which is best for you and thus saving you many hours of research and reducing time-wasting activities that often affect expatriates.

Also posted on Steemit!

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s updated and enlarged 2016 book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $149.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books. Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)

Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)

A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)

Bring with You to Chile These Little Things

Over the last 20 years that I have been associated with Chile and bringing things down here from the United States and Europe, several “little” items pop up as necessities that simply are not available in the country. Therefore, I suggest that whether you are bringing a container, pallet or many suitcases that you slips some or all of these things in.

1. Wax paper

2. Casters for rolling high-back leather or other desk chairs

3. Three hole punch and corresponding file folders

4. Manila file folders

5. Pie pans, disposable and otherwise

6. Blue cheese dressing (sometimes can be found here but it is not very good)

7. BBQ sauce

8. Power strips and extension cords with 110V plugs (USA)

9. Parallel and standard leather-covered Spanish Bibles.

10. Vaseline

11. Murphy bed kits, if you are in to space-saving

12. Bedding for USA size beds you bring, if applicable

13. Spanish grammar books and dictionaries, as many as you can find!

14. High quality paint, which is very expensive in Chile with poor selection (Behr is here)

15. Interesting kitchen cabinet insert racks

16. Door knockers and handles, available here but with limited selection

17. 9V extension cord adapters/power strip for car cigarette lighter plug

18. Toner for your laser printer, depending on your chip might not be available here

19. Cordless landline phones, available here but expensive and in more limited supply

20. Most electronic devices that can be plugged into 9V or 200V, except alarm clocks: GPS, radar detector, windows-based notebook PCs, tablets, etc. since they are more expensive here.

21. Plastic bed peg/wheel risers and plastic storage boxes to slide under the bed

22. Car parts, in case you happen to know what kind of car you will have here

23. Red and black licorice ropes

24. Skiing, camping, kayaking and fishing equipment

25. Used, good condition furniture: lazy-boy chairs are a great idea, hardwood coffee table, couches,  

maybe a dining room set, and also chairs and coffee tables. Quality used furniture can be sold at a profit.

26. Replacement electric razor heads/foil

27. Big bottles of vitamins

28. 3 x 5 note cards

29. Christmas cards to send out, basically not available here

30. baking powder

31. lamp shades

32. tape measures in inches, better variety up there than here

33. 10,000 pellets in case you expect pests where you will live 

34. Size 13 shoes and other shoes that are quality in general, better variety up there than here

35. Power transformer, 3000 watts, available here but mroe expensive 

36. Shelf liner

37. Spanish version of Kiersey temperament analysis book, Por Favor Compréndeme 

38. Books published in Argentina or Chile on grammar, also dictionaries, lexicons, verb guides, picture books, Spanish-English dictionaries (very valuable!).

39. Books on Chilean historyand geography (in English), especially Out of the Ashes by James Whelan. 

40. Maps of Chile

41. Nice chess sets 

42. Nice hardhats, if you plan to be in work areas

43. Comforters for beds 

44. High thread count sheets

45. Tums

 I might come back and add to this list so be sure to check back!

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they

would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $149.

Dr. Cobin’s sequel book, Expatriates to Chile: Topics for Living, adds even further depth on important topics to expatriates who either live in Chile already or who have Chile on the short list of countries where they hope to immigrate. The book deals with crucial issues pertaining to urban and rural real estate transactions, natural disasters, issues pertaining to emigration and its urgency, money and the quality of life, medical care and insurance, business opportunities, social manifestations (including welfare state and divorce policy concerns), Chile in the freedom indices, social maladies (lying, cheating, stealing and murder), as well as discussion of a few places worth visiting and some further comments about Santiago.

Dr. Cobin’s next sequel, Living in Chile: Key Details of History, Culture, Politics and Places for the Serious Immigrant, goes into detail that mainly those people living in Chile already or serious immigrants will be interested in. It is also of special importance to libertarians that want to know something about the political and ideological undercurrents, past highlights (like having a free port much like Hong Kong or free banking), and people that want practical information and where they can retire on their budget. The travel section compliments the other books in the series so that those that read all three books can be sure to have covered the key places of the country from top to bottom.

This book is chock full of savory details that only a true immigrant and former American with many years of experience would know. Some things are only learned over long periods of time and observation. Take advantage of tapping into Dr. Cobin’s deep knowledge of the country and insights of importance to serious immigrants.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books.

Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Immigrants that Are not Welcome in Chile

Immigrants from 51% of the countries of the world are not readily welcome in Chile. It is very difficult for most people in the world even to obtain a tourist visa. The restriction applies mainly, although not exclusively, to Third World, Muslim, violence-ridden and communist countries. Some notable non-Muslim standouts included in the lists are Armenia, Georgia, East Timor, Belarus, Ukraine, Guyana, Granada, Dominican Republic and Taiwan. Notable poor countries not on the lists include Haiti, Bolivia and Central American nations.

In our residency program, we frequently receive queries from people in India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nigeria, Iran, Vietnam and other Asian or African countries (other than South Korea, Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Fiji, Mauritius or South Africa), as well as some countries from the Caribbean and Eastern Europe. There is little that we can do for them.

According to a document from the Chilean Consulate in New York, the Chilean government requires extra-normal steps for citizens of the following countries to receive a tourist visa to come to Chile. These nationals must apply for a tourist visa prior to coming to Chile, unlike the rest of the world’s countries whose citizens receive visas in the Santiago international airport or one of Chile’s ports of entry. I have highlighted entries that might be surprising to our readers, especially ones that tend to have people that make residency program inquiries or ones where former Americans choose to become citizens of after renouncing their American citizenship (e.g., the Dominican Republic).

Applications and background checks submitted at least FOUR weeks in advance of travel to Chile:

Afghanistan, Angola, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Armenia, Azerbaijan
Bahrain, Bangladesh, Benin, Bhutan, Brunei, Burundi
Cape Verde, Chad, China (People’s Republic of), North Korea, Cuba
Djibouti
Egypt, United Arab Emirates, Eritrea, Ethiopia
Georgia
India, Iran, Iraq
Jordan
Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Kuwait
Lesotho, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya
Mali, Morocco, Mauritania, Mozambique
Namibia, Niger, Nigeria
Oman
Pakistan, Palau, Palestine
Qatar
Senegal, Sierra Leone, Syria, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan
Tanzania, Tajikistan, Togo, Tunisia, Turkmenistan
Uzbekistan
Yemen

Applications and background checks submitted at least TWO weeks in advance of travel to Chile:

Belarus, Botswana, Burkina Faso
Cameroon, Central African Republic, Comoros, Congo
Democratic Republic of Congo, Dominican Republic
East Timor (Timor Leste), Equatorial Guinea
Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Granada, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Guyana
Ivory Coast
Kiribati
Laos
Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Moldova, Mongolia, Myanmar
Nauru, Nepal
Papua New Guinea
Rwanda
Samoa, Sao Tome and Principe, Seychelles, Swaziland, Solomon Islands
Taiwan, Tuvalu
Uganda, Ukraine
Vanuatu, Vietnam
Zambia, Zimbabwe

To apply for a tourist visa, these nationals must submit the following documents: (1) a visa application form; (2) their passport valid at least from the beginning to the end of the visa; (3) a letter of invitation from someone who lives in Chile stating his/her name, address and telephone number or letter of the company or institution that invited the applicant stating the reason for his/her trip to Chile; (4) proof of economic solvency such as bank statements, and/or a letter from the company that supports the visa applicant stating his position and compensation, and/or letter from parents to ensure their financial support for the duration of the visa; (4) marriage certificate (only if the applicant is married to a Chilean citizen); (5) a health certificate issued by a physician stating that the applicant is in good health and has no diseases, issued within 30 days prior to the date of application; (6) a certificate of HIV blood test issued by a health department, laboratory, or physician, in the same period of time; (7) a criminal record certificate issued by the police; and (8) a recent photograph color passport size (2″ x 2″). All documents have to be translated into Spanish, but I imagine that documents printed in English will also be accepted. Consular fees vary according to applicant’s nationality.

Once a visa is approved by the Chilean Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the applicant must appear before a Chilean consulate for an appointment to have his/her visa stamped. For further inquiries, folks may write to cgchileny.visas@minrel.gov.cl. Stateless persons, refugees whose status has been recognized by international organizations and political refugees also must apply for a tourist visa.

The long and the short of it is that for the great majority of human beings, coming to Chile will be difficult if not impossible. While I personally feel sad for any libertarians trapped in the aforementioned countries, I have to admit that Chile’s immigration public policy probably does reduce the risk of threats to Chile and thus makes Chile more attractive to others. This policy explains in part why there are so few Muslims in Chile. I should also note that there are significant Palestinian and Chinese (mainly Cantonese) populations in Chile, indicating that people from some countries on the lists above are more readily welcome than others.

Be sure to become a member of Escape America Now and gain access to the monthly webinar. Details at www.esccapeamerianow.info. Visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country.

Dr. Cobin’s book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service–Chile Consulting–where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they

would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $49.

Dr. Cobin’s sequel book, Expatriates to Chile: Topics for Living, adds even further depth on important topics to expatriates who either live in Chile already or who have Chile on the short list of countries where they hope to immigrate. The book deals with crucial issues pertaining to urban and rural real estate transactions, natural disasters, issues pertaining to emigration and its urgency, money and the quality of life, medical care and insurance, business opportunities, social manifestations (including welfare state and divorce policy concerns), Chile in the freedom indices, social maladies (lying, cheating, stealing and murder), as well as discussion of a few places worth visiting and some further comments about Santiago.

Dr. Cobin’s next sequel, Living in Chile: Key Details of History, Culture, Politics and Places for the Serious Immigrant, goes into detail that mainly those people living in Chile already or serious immigrants will be interested in. It is also of special importance to libertarians that want to know something about the political and ideological undercurrents, past highlights (like having a free port much like Hong Kong or free banking), and people that want practical information and where they can retire on their budget. The travel section compliments the other books in the series so that those that read all three books can be sure to have covered the key places of the country from top to bottom.

This book is chock full of savory details that only a true immigrant and former American with many years of experience would know. Some things are only learned over long periods of time and observation. Take advantage of tapping into Dr. Cobin’s deep knowledge of the country and insights of importance to serious immigrants.

For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books.

Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:

Monthly Members-Only Webinar (Conference Call) Initiated

Chile is a fantastic country to live in. However, there are a lot of problems in Chile that deserve our immediate attention. Chile is our “Alamo” in the sense that there are so few freer places left on earth, such that we need to fight to defend it against the recent and ongoing incursions from the Left and pro-abortionists. It is time for libertarians and freedom-minded people to take a stand: move to Chile or get a second home in Chile. Support Freedom Orchard, for which many are still waiting to break ground.

People need to be involved in politics and active in writing and organizations that promote liberty in Chile, such as the Fundación para el Progreso, Libertad y Desarrollo and Centro de Estudios Públicos. Donors are needed for liberty research projects and to promote activism. Libertarian pastors and missionaries are needed to establish or encourage good, non-statist churches and encourage people not to rely on statist idolatries and interventionism in their own lives.

To that end, I have been providing relatively inexpensive books on Chile, and freebies like the internet radio show Red Hot Chile and this blog to help people get informed and stay that way. Now we have a special, inexpensive, annual membership service which will include a monthly conference call (webinar) wherein you can interact with me directly and ask questions or discuss issues. I suggest that you take advantage of the membership special today (one-half price, US$49.99, for a limited time) and join me on the first webinar at noon (ET) on Saturday, May 31, 2014.

I know a lot about Chile: politics, business, taxes, housing, farmland, relationships, culture, etc. Now you will have a chance to talk about any topic related to Chile that interests you, or just listen to the questions and comments of others on the line. Normally, I charge US$995 for an initial consultation, so this webinar is a relative bargain.

Of course, I still offer regular consulting services and visa/residency program services. As you might imagine, those services have been picking up in recent years, as people get more serious about breaking away from “the land of the free” and other interventionist nations north of the Tropic of Cancer. But in the meantime, I hope to see and hear from you on the upcoming webinar or on future webinars (normally the last Saturday of the month) after you become an EscapeAmericaNow member.

    Chile is a freer place than most countries (ranked 7th by Heritage Foundation for 2014) and looks better and better all the time. You might consider investing in the country and even moving to Chile. Chile has a new sustainable community starting called Freedom Orchard. Check it out. Buy your “Plan B” lot in it, and diversify out of the decaying assets in “First World” nations.
Also, be sure to tune in to Dr. Cobin’s radio program: “Red Hot Chile” at noon (ET) on Fridays on the Overseas Radio Network (ORN). You can also join the thousands of other people who download the shows each month via the archive link on our Red Hot Chile page (recorded show updated every Monday morning).
Be sure, too, to visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country and what’s going on with Freedom Orchard.
Dr. Cobin’s book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service – Chile Consulting – where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $49.
Dr. Cobin’s sequel book, Expatriates to Chile: Topics for Living, adds even further depth on important topics to expatriates who either live in Chile already or who have Chile on the short list of countries where they hope to immigrate. The book deals with crucial issues pertaining to urban and rural real estate transactions, natural disasters, issues pertaining to emigration and its urgency, money and the quality of life, medical care and insurance, business opportunities, social manifestations (including welfare state and divorce policy concerns), Chile in the freedom indices, social maladies (lying, cheating, stealing and murder), as well as discussion of a few places worth visiting and some further comments about Santiago.
For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books.
Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:
Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)
Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)
A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)These and other resources can be found on the Escape America Now resource page.

Escape America Now Membership & Webinars

Some of you may have noticed some new options on the website, such as memberships, books, etc. In an effort to make things easier and provide more options for folks interested in Chile, we’ve implemented some tools and now offer more options.

One of the services we’ve launched is a membership program with two levels. Both memberships include a monthly webinar with Dr. Cobin, usually on the last Saturday of the month. Our first one is scheduled for this coming Saturday, May 31, 2014. Because we haven’t been successful in launching this until now, anyone who’s paid for their membership already will have their subscription renewed this month. Your new expirey should be May 31, 2015. Another feature of membership is access to the new Escape America Now forums where you can interact with others who are either in the same situation, or have been there. We hope you’re able to solidify your networking in Chile as you interact with other members.

Basic membership provides the intro book, Chile: A Primer for Expats, and will have additional materials provided as time goes on. You can apply your fee to visa/residency services too. Right now there’s a special half-price offer to early subscribers. Normally the subscription would be $99.99, but for a limited number of people the price will be $49.99, yet you still get to apply the full $99.99 credit to the visa/residency service.

Premium membership is based more on John’s consulting services, and includes all three books, as well as other premium resources, a two hour consultation with Dr. Cobin and access to the premium section of the forums. Dr. Cobin will interact some in the premium forums, though there is no guarantee of how often. This is a lifetime membership that all consultation clients receive, but in this case the $999.99 fee can be applied to your visa/residency needs as well.

More details can be found on the Escape America Now Membership page.

Places to Retire in Chile for Every Budget

I have been dealing with newcomers and immigrants from different walks of life for many years. Some are relatively rich, others relatively poor. One’s economic situation is independent of his political views and thus freedom-loving people from all social classes are making their way to Chile. Some plan to work. Others plan to start a business.

Most likely these two types of people will locate near Santiago, and possibly near Viña del Mar or Concepción and possibly even Iquique, Talca, Temuco or Puerto Montt. However, many come with the intention of full retirement or partial retirement with some consulting, travel or internet business. In fact, most newcomers tend to be in their late 40s and 50s and are looking to retire or semi-retire. While every retiree would like to live in the nicer parts of Chile (First World sections), many will find these areas to be out of their financial reach.

I hate to see people be discouraged when they arrive or feel like they are living beyond their means. Thus, I hope to provide a “short list” of cities or towns for people to consider, listed according to one’s economic situation, which will allow them to begin studying options prior to coming down.

Where should retirees be looking to live? The table below summarizes my suggestions based on a couple’s net worth and/or pension check. These are my recommendations. And remember that I have been in every town over 500 inhabitants in Chile (except Isla Juan Fernández). So I speak from experience.

There are certainly other communities that would fit each category, especially categories 2 and 3, but I have chosen the places that I have visited that have some virtue and (with a few exceptions) that have at least 5,000 people. Hence, the towns come with at least a few shops, stores, churches, restaurants, etc.

Of course, the larger urban locations listed come with far greater commercial and social benefits. Having said that, I should point out that there are dozens of tiny towns, often in the middle of nowhere, in which a couple could survive on a very tight budget if they chose to do so. I just find that almost no couples that I have met have expressed such a preference.

Immigrant’s Net Worth; cost of home (USD); typical size in square meters
Possible places to retire (Dr. Cobin’s suggestions), towns ≥ 5,000 inhabitants, congruent with social class and affordability
Level of medical care quality, monthly cost per couple (USD)
Probability of personally having to do some agricultural or construction work to survive; local food costs
Likely transportation mode; non-local travel potential
Social class; variety of shopping, clubs, churches, jobs, schools, maid service, etc. accessible
Category 1
Net Worth: $75,000
House budget:
$11,000
House size (m2)
70
Rainy, coastal, cold
§ Puerto Aguirre (2,000 inhabitants only, isolated)
§ Puerto Cisnes
§ Porvenir
Low, $75
High; low
Bus, ferry; none
D; poor
Category 2
Net Worth: $250,000 or
$100,000 plus monthly pension of $1,000
House budget:
$45,000
House size (m2)
90
Desert, no rain, river
§ Camiña valley area (tax free zone)
§ Pica (4,200 inhabitants, tax free zone)
§ Alto de Carmen and San Félix valley area
Desert, no rain, sea
§ Huasco
Arid, little rain
§ Vicuña
§ Salamanca
§ Petorca
Dry 6-8 mos., farming
§ Limache
§ Quillota
§ Villa Alemana
§ Los Andes
§ San José de Maipo
§ Santa Cruz
§ Curicó
§ Chillán
§ Los Ángeles
Dry 8 mos., sea coast
§ Algarrobo
§ El Tabo
§ Quintay
§ Laguna Verde (near Valparaíso)
Green, rain, quaint
§ Curacautín
§ Lonquimay
§ San Pedro de la Paz
§ Collipulli
§ Angol
§ Santa Bárbara
§ Victoria
§ Temuco
§ Pitrufquén
§ Valdivia
§ La Unión
§ Río Bueno
Green, rain, lake
§ Lago Ranco
§ Futrono
§ Puerto Octay
§ Chile Chico
§ Cochrane
Green, rain, sea coast
§ Puerto Montt
§ Ancud
§ Puqueldón (only 1,000 inhabitants but close to bigger populations)
§ Queilén
§ Chaitén (tax free cars)
Green, rain, lake
§ Futaleufú (tax free cars)
§ Palena (tax free cars)
Cold, rain, sea, views
§ Puerto Natales (tax free cars)
§ Puerto Williams (tax free cars)
Moderate, $200
Moderate; low
Bus, metro, ferry;
C; modest
Category 3
Net Worth: $600,000 or
$300,000 plus monthly pension of $2,000
House budget:
$175,000
House size (m2)
90
Desert, no rain, ocean
§ Arica (tax free cars)
§ Iquique (tax free zone)
Arid, some rain, sea
§ La Serena
§ Papudo
Arid, some rain, river
§ San Pedro de Atacama
§ Paihuano
§ Ovalle
§ Illapel
Santiago area
§ Huecheraba
§ Chicureo
§ Ñuñoa
§ Las Condes (south)
§ Providencia (west)
§ Peñalolén (southeast)
§ Freedom Orchard (Curacaví)
Dry 8 mos., farming
§ Limache
§ Quillota
§ Villa Alemana
Coastal 5th Region
Dry 8 mos., coastal
§ Maitencillo
§ Viña del Mar
§ Concón
§ Algarrobo
§ Algarrobo
§ Rocas de Santo Domingo
Dry 8 mos, mountains
§ San José de Maipo
§ Santa Cruz
Green, rain, river/falls
§ Curacautín
§ Lonquimay
§ La Unión
§ Río Bueno
§ Valdivia
§ Coyhaique (tax free cars)
Green, rain, lake
§ Villarrica
§ Panguipulli
§ Puerto Octay
Cold, wind, sea
§ Punta Arenas (tax free zone)
Good, $400
Low; high
Bus, metro, ferry, basic car
C; very good
Category 4
Net Worth: $1,000,000 or
$650,000 plus monthly pension of $2,000
House budget:
$400,000
House size (m2)
140
Arid, some rain, coast
La Serena communities
§ Las Tacas
§ Puerto Velero
§ Serena Golf
Santiago area
§ Las Condes
§ Vitacura
§ La Dehesa
§ Providencia
§ La Reina Alta
§ Freedom Orchard (Curacaví)
Coastal 5th Region
Dry 8 mos.
§ Zapallar
§ Concón (south)
§ Reñaca
§ Viña del Mar (west)
§ Miraflores
§ Algarrobo
§ Rocas de Santo Domingo and Las Brisas
Concepción area
§ San Pedro de la Paz
§ Andalué
§ Idahue
§ Pingüeral
§ Lonco
Green, rain, city
§ Temuco
Green, rain, lake
§ Villarrica
§ Pucón
§ Panguipulli
§ Puerto Varas
§ Frutillar bajo
§ Puerto Octay outlying area
Excellent, $500
None; highest
Metro, ferry, nice car
C or B; excellent
Category 5
Net Worth: $10,000,000
House budget:
$2,000,000
House size (m2)
500
La Serena communities
§ Las Tacas
§ Puerto Velero
§ Serena Golf
Santiago area
§ Lo Curro
§ Santa María Manquehue
§ Las Condes
§ Vitacura
§ La Dehesa
§ Providencia
§ La Reina Alta
§ Freedom Orchard (Curacaví)
Coastal 5th Region
Dry 8 mos.
§ Zapallar
§ Concón (south)
§ Reñaca
§ Viña del Mar (west)
§ Miraflores
§ Rocas de Santo Domingo and Las Brisas
Concepción area
§ Lonco
Green, rain, lake
§ Pucón
§ Puerto Varas
§ Vichuquén (4,335 inhabitants)
Excellent, $600
None; highest
Metro, ferry, nice car, plane
A; excellent

Note that Freedom Orchard’s (Curacaví) target market is for categories 4 and 5, and possible category 3. Special thanks goes to my wife Pamela for suggesting that I do this blog entry and providing some input into the contents and structural improvements to the table above.

    Chile is a freer place than most countries (ranked 7th by Heritage Foundation for 2014) and looks better and better all the time. You might consider investing in the country and even moving to Chile. Chile has a new sustainable community starting called Freedom Orchard. Check it out. Buy your “Plan B” lot in it, and diversify out of the decaying assets in “First World” nations.
Also, be sure to tune in to Dr. Cobin’s radio program: “Red Hot Chile” at noon (ET) on Fridays on the Overseas Radio Network (ORN). You can also join the thousands of other people who download the shows each month via the archive link on our Red Hot Chile page (recorded show updated every Monday morning).
Be sure, too, to visit AllAboutChile.com for discussion and forums about the country and what’s going on with Freedom Orchard.
Dr. Cobin’s book, Life in Chile: A Former American’s Guide for Newcomers, is the most comprehensive treatise on Chilean life ever written, designed to help newcomers get settled in Chile. He covers almost every topic imaginable for immigrants. This knowledge is applied in his valet consulting service – Chile Consulting – where he guides expatriates through the process of finding a place to live and settle in Chile, helping them glide over the speed bumps that they would otherwise face in getting their visas, setting up businesses, buying real estate, investing in Chilean stocks or gold coins, etc. The cost is $49.
Dr. Cobin’s sequel book, Expatriates to Chile: Topics for Living, adds even further depth on important topics to expatriates who either live in Chile already or who have Chile on the short list of countries where they hope to immigrate. The book deals with crucial issues pertaining to urban and rural real estate transactions, natural disasters, issues pertaining to emigration and its urgency, money and the quality of life, medical care and insurance, business opportunities, social manifestations (including welfare state and divorce policy concerns), Chile in the freedom indices, social maladies (lying, cheating, stealing and murder), as well as discussion of a few places worth visiting and some further comments about Santiago.
For a brief introduction consider Dr. Cobin’s abridged book (56 pages): Chile: A Primer for Expats ($19), offering highlights found in the two larger books.
Buy Dr. Cobin’s Public Policy books at Amazon.com:
Christian Theology of Public Policy: Highlighting the American Experience (2006)
Bible and Government: Public Policy from a Christian Perspective (2003)
A Primer on Modern Themes in Free Market Economics and Policy (2009)These and other resources can be found on the Escape America Now resource page.

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